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Tables of Cruising Levels

3 CRUISING LEVELS

3.1 General

The cruising level at which a flight or a portion of a flight is to be conducted shall be in terms of:

a. Flight level, for en route flights above the transition altitude.

b. Altitude, for en route flights at or below the transition altitude.

Note: the highest obstacle in the Netherlands has an elevation of less than 1500 ft AMSL. Since the transition altitude is 3000 ft AMSL for all IFR flights (departing, arriving and en route) no terrain clearance considerations need to be taken into account when using the flight level system. For this reason no need exists for the determination of 'minimum usable flight levels' ('corresponding to, or immediately above, the established minimum flight altitude' - PANS-ATM, III-4).

3.2 VFR flights

VFR flights operated in level cruising flight above 3500 ft AMSL shall be conducted at a flight level appropriate to the track as specified in paragraph 3.4 (table of cruising levels), except when otherwise indicated in ATC clearances.

3.3 IFR flights

3.3.1 Within controlled airspace

The cruising level for IFR flights in controlled airspace shall be selected from the table of cruising levels specified in paragraph 3.4. The correlation of levels to track prescribed in paragraph 3.4 shall not apply along the ATS routes and helicopter routes listed in paragraph 3.4.1 or when otherwise indicated in ATC clearances.

3.3.2 Outside controlled airspace

An IFR flight operating in level cruising flight outside controlled airspace shall be flown at a cruising level appropriate to its track as specified in paragraph 3.4 table of cruising levels.

The correlation of levels to track prescribed in paragraph 3.4 shall not apply along the helicopter routes listed in paragraph 3.4.1.

3.4 Table of cruising levels

Magnetic track

From 000° to 179°

From 180° to 359°

IFR

VFR1)

IFR

VFR1)

FL

Altitude

FL

FL

Altitude

FL

-

1000 ft

-

-

2000 ft

-

-

3000 ft

-

-

-

-

030

-

035

040

-

045

050

-

055

060

-

065

070

-

075

080

-

085

090

-

095

100

-

105

110

-

115

120

-

125

130

-

135

140

-

145

150

-

155

160

-

165

170

-

175

180

-

185

190

-

195

200

-

-

210

-

-

220

-

-

230

-

-

240

-

-

250

-

-

260

-

-

270

-

-

280

-

-

290

-

-

300

-

-

310

-

-

320

-

-

330

-

-

340

-

-

350

-

-

360

-

-

370

-

-

380

-

-

390

-

-

400

-

-

410

-

-

430

-

-

450

-

-

470

-

-

etc.

 

 

etc.

 

 

1) For VFR flights above 3500 ft AMSL.

Note: for flights above the transition altitude the lowest flight level to be selected is the first appropriate (IFR or VFR) flight level corresponding with, or immediately above, the common transition level for the Amsterdam FIR (see note paragraph 3.1).

Note: to IFR flights of a random character cruising at or below 3000 ft AMSL, ATC will normally assign a single IFR altitude for the entire flight. In flight planning the selection of a single semicircular altitude based on the 'altitude-to-track' correlation of the most significant portion of the route.

3.4.1 Exceptions

The following ATS routes and helicopter routes do not comply to the standard semicircular altitude-to-track correlation prescribed in paragraph 3.4.

• KZ10 (AGISI-AGASO)

• KZ15 (BOGTI-BELAP)

• UL193/L193

• UL745/L745

• UN872/N872 (WOODY-PAM)

• UN873/N873 (HELEN-SPY)

• Z310

• Z311

• UP603

• UZ707

3.5 Gliders

Gliders are usually equipped with altimeters calibrated in metres.

The glider circuits in the Netherlands are based there-on and the terrain heights, given in metres, will be of great help when making a landing after a cross country flight.

Glider pilots will practically never fly horizontally, however, for safety reasons it is very important that above 3500 ft (1065 m) AMSL the procedure mentioned in paragraph 3.2 will be adhered to, such in connection with the determination of the height with respect to the lower limit of areas in which VFR flights are prohibited or for reporting by radio.

In order to avoid the areas in which VFR flights are prohibited, glider pilots are advised to use the table below to convert their altimeter reading from metres into flight level.

Above 1065 m (3500 ft) AMSL the altimeter subscale should be set on 1013.2 hPa The relation between indicated reading in metres and flight level above this altitude is:

m

FL

m

FL

m

FL

760

025

2590

085

4420

145

915

030

2745

090

4570

150

1065

035

2895

095

4725

155

1220

040

3050

100

4875

160

1370

045

3200

105

5030

165

1525

050

3355

110

5180

170

1675

055

3505

115

5335

175

1830

060

3660

120

5485

180

1980

065

3810

125

5740

185

2135

070

3960

130

5790

190

2285

075

4115

135

5945

195

2440

080

4265

140